2017 Grantees

Each year One World Media offers funding to young journalists and students based in the UK to help them cover a story in a developing country. See below for details of the current grantees.

Aghnia Adzkia

Freelance – reporting from Indonesia

Aghnia Adzkia

Cosima Barzini

Freelance – reporting from India

Cosima Barzini

Hugh Davies

Freelance – reporting from El Salvador

Hugh Davies

Shane Donglasan

Freelance – reporting from Philippines

Shane Donglasan

Luke Radcliff

Freelance – reporting from Myanmar

Luke Radcliff

Alice Rowsome

Freelance – reporting from Lebanon

Alice Rowsome

Arij Al-Soltan

Freelance – reporting from Iraq

Arij Al-Soltan

Helen Spooner

Freelance – reporting from Brazil

Helen Spooner

Eve Watling

Freelance – reporting from Cambodia

Eve Watling
Aghnia Adzkia

Aghnia is a freelance journalist who is currently studying for her MA in Digital Journalism at Goldsmiths, University of London. She previously spent two years working as a digital journalist for CNN in Indonesia, covering corruption and human rights. She won two awards for her work on the Tolikara riot in Indonesia. Aghnia was also the recipient of a Corruption Eradication Commission prize at a national anti-corruption writing competition.

 

THE STORY:

Aghnia will be travelling to Indonesia to cover the experiences of transgender workers studying at an Islamic boarding school, and the stigma and persecution that they face in wider society.  

 

AMBITION:

To produce long-form multimedia articles and documentary content focused on under-represented communities around the globe.

 

 Follow Aghnia on Twitter or on LinkedIn 

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Alice Rowsome

Alice is a French-British multimedia journalist who primarily reports on the environment, women and refugees. Pachamama, a feature-length documentary, which she produced, filmed and edited, shed light on the impact of climate change on an indigenous community in the Bolivian Andes and premiered at Chatham House in 2016. More recently, her work in Ethiopia, Somaliland, India and Lebanon has been published by outlets such as The Guardian, VICE Impact, Broadly, RefugeesDeeply, WIRED and UNHCR. She graduated with a Masters in Arabic and International Relations from the University of St Andrews in 2016. 

 

THE STORY:

Alice will travel to Lebanon to make a short film about the women behind a pioneering recycling social enterprise. The film will explore the power of grassroots projects to effect change. Living in some of the most impoverished neighbourhoods, these women are tackling Lebanon’s garbage crisis hands on. 

 

AMBITION:

To produce documentaries and multimedia projects that change perspectives and impact change. 

 

Follow Alice on Twitter or check out her website

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Arij Al-Soltan

Arij is a British-Iraqi filmmaker and producer.  She has 15 years’ experience in the film industry and she alternates between directing independent films and producing corporate films, TV Commercials, animation and dramas. Arij has travelled and filmed extensively in the Middle East including in Iraq, Syria, Egypt and Lebanon and finds the region a constant source of inspiration.

 

THE STORY:

Arij will travel to Baghdad to explore the increasing popularity of K-Pop among some young Iraqis. Although Iraqi and Korean cultures are seemingly very different, these dedicated fans have found ways to bring them together to create a unique and exciting cultural fusion.

 

AMBITION:

To produce films that are visually appealing and thought-provoking at the same time.

 

Follow Arij on LinkedIn 

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Cosima Barzini

Cosima is a London-based, French and Italian filmmaker.  She graduated from Leeds University in 2013 with a BA History of Art degree. Since then she has worked in Advertising in Paris and TV Production in Rome, as well as completing a Master’s degree in Documentary Film at LCC, University of the Arts London.

Cosima is currently working as a freelance camera assistant on documentaries, music videos and promos. She also films and edits her own documentaries and is passionate about sociological and cultural stories.

 

THE STORY:

At the foot of the Himalayas, a group of young women are training to become India’s first ice hockey team with little to no equipment in the harshest of conditions. This documentary will show the clash between traditional and progressive values, and what it means to be an ambitious woman in 21st Century Ladakh.  

 

AMBITION:

To create documentaries that will make an impact on the lives of the people in her films and to become an established documentary cameraperson.

 

Follow Cosima on Instagram or check out her website

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Eve Watling

After graduating from Sussex University with an English and Film degree, Eve worked in Cambodia as a magazine editor and freelance writer for two and a half years. She will complete her MA in Journalism from Goldsmiths, University of London this year. She is interested in reporting unexpected stories.

 

THE STORY:

Factories are the backbone of the Cambodian economy, and most garment workers are young women. Many have left the provinces for the urban outreaches of Phnom Penh. Although low wages and poor working conditions mean life is extremely difficult, there is an overlooked upside to Cambodia’s industrial upheaval. On leaving their close-knit and often socially conservative villages for the sprawling apartment complexes on the outskirts of Phnom Penh, lesbian women have found a community that largely accepts them for who they are.

 

AMBITION:

To keep reporting and exploring different media forms.

 

Follow Eve on Twitter or check out her website

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Helen Spooner

Helen studied Geography at Oxford University before completing her Masters in Development at SOAS. She currently works as an Assistant Producer at Insight TWI. Her work has taken her to Northern Iraq where she successfully helped make a film for BBC3 about the Yazidi sex slaves who had fled ISIS and were taking up arms to fight on the frontlines.

 

THE STORY:

Helen will be travelling to Maranhão state in the Brazilian Amazon to report on the Ka’apor tribe who are involved in violent clashes with the illegal loggers that are encroaching on their lands.

 

AMBITION:

To make powerful, thoughtful documentaries with the people at the centre of the story.   

 

Follow Helen on Twitter

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Hugh Davies

Hugh is an Assistant Producer at Insight TWI and has worked on documentaries broadcast on the BBC, Channel 4 and Al Jazeera English. He has worked on three of AJE’s Investigates series covering a variety of human rights issues, ranging from slavery in Brazil’s fashion industry to extrajudicial killings by police in Kenya. He was shortlisted for the Anthony Howard Award for Young Journalists.

 

THE STORY:

Hugh will travel to El Salvador, the most violent peacetime nation on earth. In a country ruled by gangsters, he’ll ask the question: how do you leave the gang? The story will be told through the lens of three characters: a tattoo removal artist, a gangster-turned-preacher and a tuna-packing factory worker. 

 

AMBITION:

To make thought-provoking documentaries that will hopefully have an impact. 

 

Follow Hugh on Twitter

 

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Luke Radcliff

Eager to make his way into the world of documentary, Luke spent two years at international distributor Journeyman Pictures, helping a varied slate of award-winning films and hard-hitting reportage reach worldwide audiences. Now, hoping to play a bigger part in finding and telling the stories that matter, he is finishing a Masters in TV Journalism at Goldsmiths, University of London and undertaking research for a production company. 

 

THE STORY:

Hill tribe troops played a fundamental role in bringing an end to the war in Myanmar (previously Burma) in 1945. Their sacrifices, loyalty, and story however, became a rarely told detail in tales of ‘The Forgotten Army’. 

 

AMBITION:

To grow as a journalist and documentary filmmaker. To engage audiences with great stories that explain why the world is the way it is.

 

Follow Luke on Twitter

 

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Shane Donglasan

Shane is a Filipino-American multimedia journalist interested in covering stories centred around marginalized communities and social inequalities. She has worked across various forms of media including print, film and radio, but her main passion is photography. Her most recent work includes a short documentary about refugees’ experiences of integration in Brighton, England and a photo documentary project about Filipino domestic workers fighting for better rights in the U.K. Her stories have been featured in the BBC and in various media outlets based in the U.S.

 

THE STORY:

Overfishing has become the number one threat to the environment in many parts of the Philippines. A group of women from the small Philippine island of Caringo, however, have banded together to protect their surrounding waters from illegal fishing, taking the lead in watching over the fish and protecting coral sanctuaries from intruders. Acting as guardians of their surrounding waters, the women of Caringo Island are challenging gender norms and re-defining gender roles in the Philippines’ coastal communities, where the fishing industry and marine protection are normally controlled by males.

 

AMBITION:

To help NGOs tell their international development stories through photography

 

Check out Shane’s website 

 

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